jeng

sometimes you needed a time and space to explore the world and or tell everyone what you feel and think. tumblr is I guess one of the best avenue. i don't have any words to describe myself here. maybe you can just pretty heart my posts here where everything tells who i am.

Life’s as kind as you let it be.

—Charles Bukowski, Hot Water Music (via feellng)

malacanan:

Aside from the Masonic influence on the Katipunan, the design of the Philippine flag has roots in the flag family to which it belongs—that of the last group of colonies that sought independence from the Spanish Empire at the close of the 19th century, a group to which the Philippines belongs.
PCDSPO traces the origins of the Philippine flag’s design elements, which have been in use since General Emilio Aguinaldo first conceived them—the stars and stripes; the red, white, and blue; the masonic triangle; and the sun—and have endured since.
May 28–June 12 are the Flag Days. Learn more about the historical development of the Philippine flag.

malacanan:

Aside from the Masonic influence on the Katipunan, the design of the Philippine flag has roots in the flag family to which it belongs—that of the last group of colonies that sought independence from the Spanish Empire at the close of the 19th century, a group to which the Philippines belongs.

PCDSPO traces the origins of the Philippine flag’s design elements, which have been in use since General Emilio Aguinaldo first conceived them—the stars and stripes; the red, white, and blue; the masonic triangle; and the sun—and have endured since.

fluffyisha:

If a person laughs too much, even on stupid things, that person is sad deep inside. #psychologicalfacts (Taken with instagram)

fluffyisha:

If a person laughs too much, even on stupid things, that person is sad deep inside. #psychologicalfacts (Taken with instagram)

Based on a psychological study, a crush only lasts for a maximum of 4 months. If it exceeds, then you are already in love.

I call BS, and I’ll tell you why:

I’m not sure how many of you read actual peer-reviewed journal articles, but those of you who do know that “crush” isn’t a very scientific word. In fact, as I look through the American Psychological Association’s database, every single article—except for one—use crush in the literal sense. These articles discuss “nerve crush” or “crush injury,” nothing remotely related to the what teenagers have in mind when they hear the word crush. 

The one exception, an article written by Bowker, Spencer, Thomas, and Gyoerkoe (2012) does talk about the crush being referred to in the quote. However, the article only mentions that, based on their data, 56% of the adolescents they surveyed had at least one current other-sex crush. Another finding was that physical attractiveness, relational aggression, physical aggression, and popularity were significantly associated with other-sex crush scores. At no point in the study do the authors attempt to measure how long a crush lasts.

Which brings me to my third point. The concepts of crush and love, just like the concepts of happiness or sadness, are not always measured the same from study to study. Suppose you were asked to measure the amount of sadness of 5 people. How would you do that? You can’t just take a device and measure sadness the way you would measure temperature. You would first have to formulate an operational definition, or a definition that attempts to make the abstract word more concrete.

One operational definition of sadness could be “The amount of times a person cries during the day.” This definition enables you to measure something—the amount of times a person cries during the day—and label it as sadness. A different researcher may use a different operational definition of sadness, one which may or may not be better than the one used here. So to say that the words crush and love have the same exact meaning from study to study, or person to person, is not always correct. The subject gets a bit more technical from here, so I’ll leave you with the original point of this post: the quote is complete BS.

Reference:

Bowker, J.C., Spencer, S.V., Thomas, K.K., & Gyoerkoe, E.A. (2012). Having and being an other-sex crush during early adolescence. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 111(4). 629-643.

(via badpsych)